Where should I include my references?

Where should I include my references?

Where should I include my references?

at the bottom of the document, or a line that says, “References available upon request.” They often do this in anticipation of the hiring manager asking for the names of professional colleagues or acquaintances who can speak to their character and/or skills.

Do companies really call your references?

Essentially, yes. While it’s true that not 100% of Human Resources (HR) departments will call your references during pre-employment screening, many do. The references you provide to employers may be contacted about your employment history, qualifications, and the skills that qualify you for the job.

Is it better to quit or be fired?

“It’s always better for your reputation if you resign, because it makes it look like the decision was yours –– not theirs,” Levit says. “But if you resign, you may not be entitled to the type of compensation you would receive if you were fired.”

What information can you give in a reference?

You should only provide information concerning job-related details in a reference. You shouldn’t discuss personal details about an employee, which can include references to her race, religion, age or disability status.

Can I sue my former employer for giving bad references?

The answer is yes! You can file a lawsuit against your former employer for giving out negative references about you. You can potentially sue for defamation. Your former employer must have made false statements about you.